Top 20 Companies To Work For…

Success is no accident

Years ago I managed the process that led to GlaxoSmithKline capturing the coveted Employer of Choice Award. It was indeed a great place to work. Since then I have always been encouraged by other companies who achieve the same feat and become the envy of many who long for a great place to work…somewhere you can’t wait to jump out of bed in the mornings to get to.

Fortune 100 Best revealed its list of the top 100 Best companies to work for in 2019. Here I share the top 20.

  1. Hilton
  2. Salesforce
  3. Wegmans Food Market Inc
  4. Workday
  5. Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants
  6. Cisco
  7. Edward Jones
  8. Ultimate Software
  9. Texas Health Resources
  10. The Boston Consulting Group Inc
  11. Stryker Corporation
  12. Publix Super Markets Inc
  13. American Express
  14. Quicken Loans
  15. Orrick
  16. Baird
  17. JM Family Enterprises
  18. Kimley-Horn
  19. Camden Property Trust
  20. Cooley LLP

 

Didn’t see your company’s name? Check the list to see where they fall.

Cheers!

 

Being Micro Managed?


You Micro Manager! Yes you. Repeat after me…I will not micromanage. I will not micromanage. I will not micromanage. These are the best words of caution for new managers.

Micromanagement is a management style whereby a manager closely observes or controls the work of subordinates or employees. Micromanagement generally has a negative connotation. Wiki

I was asked the question why some managers feel it necessary to micro manage. Reflecting on that I decided to share through this post.

Managers who micromanage makes coming to work a nightmare. Micro Management is the practice of managing with excessive control or attention to detail. It tells employees that there is a lack of trust. Essentially that the manager has little confidence in his/her team and their capabilities. Often it drives the team away and what is worse, it is the organization’s most talented people who frequently walk away. The company is then left with those workers who will simply show up for a ‘paycheck’. No commitment, no care.

Signs of Micro Management

If you are a micro manager, Harvard Business shared signs that can be seen:

  • You’re never quite satisfied with deliverables
  • You often feel frustrated because you would have gone about the task differently
  • You laser in on the details and take price and/or pain in making corrections
  • You constantly want to know where all your team members are and what they are working on
  • You ask for frequent updates on where things stand
  • You prefer to be cc’d on emails

As a manager, this is certainly grounds for disaster. You will either drive your team crazy or stress yourself out with the inevitable burn out.

How to Manage:

As a new manager if you find yourself micro managing here are a few points to keep in mind:

  • Don’t be afraid to fail. At its very core is the feeling that if you don’t do things yourself, things are going to fail. Not so. This is a myth. Sometimes failure is good. It helps us learn and grow, and our teams may end up with the belief that you are ‘human’. They will work together with you to achieve the results. Essentially, you will win.

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  • Focus on the ‘what’ not the ‘how’. I am a firm believer in sharing the organization and your department’s goal with your team.  Doing so stimulates their creativity and provides solutions that you may not have considered.
  • Let it go. The difference between managing and micromanaging is in the ‘micro’. Let go of watching people. Here’s how:

-Look at your to-do list to see which task can be passed on or delegated to those reporting to you.

-Engage your team. Let them know what level of detail you expect from them and where they need to connect with you.

-Think Big. Focus on the big issues that you need to concentrate on and place your energy and attention on those.

Being Micro-Managed?

If you are being micro-managed, Research Psychologist Dr. Peggy Drexler suggests a few pointers you can use to remain sane:

  • Do your job well.
  • Ask how you’re doing
  • Be a proactive communicator. Copy supervisor on emails. Keep him/her up to date on your activities before being asked.
  • Teach him/her how to delegate. Volunteer to help with tasks or projects and keep your manager abreast of the progress.

Practicing these points will help you succeed. The converse is also true. Continuing to micro manage is Ancient…a thing of the past where autocratic leadership was game. Doing this now is sure grounds for disaster.

So it’s your choice. Choose wisely and experience success.

Workplace Trends

flexible work

In a major survey with human resource executives, managers, and more Forbes Magazine writer Dan Schawbel predicts 10 workplace trends expected in 2016. These are based on companies doing more with fewer resources in the midst of advances in technology and security issues arising as a result. Some challenges include the war for talent, adapting to change, and the need for workforce training. Compare and Contrast these trends and check your industry knowledge, and readiness.

  1. The acceptance of boomerang employees and the challenges for job seekers.
  2. The leadership gap will start being filled as boomers retire in numbers.
  3. Workplace flexibility becomes the biggest topic of conversation. Includes employees being reachable outside of office hours on their personal time. Work week up from 40 to 47 hours.
  4. Wearable technology (e.g. Apple watch, Fitbit) is being taken more seriously and disrupts business as usual. Wearables take advantage of our 24/7 business environment and helps workers retrieve information and be more efficient.
  5. Companies get serious about office design and use it as a way to increase collaboration and attract top talent.
  6. Obamacare takes full effect, causing premiums to surge and companies to pass more costs to employees. In order to remain profitable, companies will have to hire freelancers and remove some or all full-time workers.
  7. Companies figure out how to automate more jobs and modernize their workplaces at the cost of employees. But new jobs will be created.
  8. The first group of Generation Z will enter the workforce. They will choose work-life balance over salary, and will be seen more connected through technology.
  9. More professionals seek gigs instead of full-time jobs as the sharing and freelance market place expand.
  10. Maternity leave becomes bigger discussion as employee benefit

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