Write That Resignation Letter…

Begin with the end in mind. Write that resignation letter. Then begin to plan your escape route.

What are you escaping from? A boring job? Restrictions that immensely tug at your creativity? Doing something that has been calling your name?

Writing your resignation letter is similar to stepping out. Stepping away from something. It’s final. As head of Human Resources, it was hard receiving this letter from a member of the organization. Some should go (e.g. problematic worker) and we smirk when they do. But in the main 95 percent of the team we mourn as in a loss. It means they’re onto the next chapter of their life and no matter what, they go. We too needed to move on.

Move On

That’s what companies do. They move on. That’s what YOU should do. If you are unhappy, longing for more…do yourself a favor and move on.

Write that letter. It will boost you to take the steps to move into your next phase. But remember don’t hand it in until your plans are finalized… Until you have been offered and accepted that new job; or that new opportunity. Because once you do, there’s no turning back (especially if you fall into that category of problematic employee …smile).

Need help? Lets connect

Cheers!

Planning To Take Vacation This Year? 35 Percent Don’t. Here’s Why…

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Hawaii, Paris, Caribbean, Central America, Vegas, or a Simple Staycation. It’s amazing what a little break can do to our mental capacity. From the planning, organizing and more, all exude times of exhilaration, relaxation and joy!

Yet…The Society of Human Resources Associates (SHRM) shared that over 35 percent of Americans don’t plan on taking all their vacation days this year. A potential year of the Cranks in the making? Here are the reasons cited:

  • 43% Saving time for something later
  • 21% Too much work
  • 15% Don’t have enough money
  • 9% Feel guilty
  • 9% Other reasons
  • 3% Discouraged by their boss

In light of the more transient workforce, employers are trying various options to attract quality applicants. Such measures include a combined databank of employee time off which includes up to 4 weeks off on date of hire. Naturally, employees are ecstatic of this change and proves it’s a great methodology for recruitment. However, this databank represents a combination of paid time off including sick and vacation.

Paid Time Off

Do you plan on taking your vacation this year? If so, great! If not, why not? Does your reason fall into any of the above? Something to think about.

Need help with your workforce plans? Lets connect!

Cheers!

Top 20 Emerging Jobs….

“To Stand Still is to be left Behind”

Times are changing. Often what we think would last forever, changes in a moment–without warning, and without notice. No one is exempt. If you are a business leader, you may be contemplating industry changes and its impact on your business. On the other hand, you may be an individual thinking of a career change or better yet, if you are thinking of staying put in your career for many more years to come, it might be a good idea to take a look at LinkedIn’s Emerging Jobs report, that was recently published. The report provides information on the changes in jobs/careers. Jobs will grow to over 11.5 Million by 2026, as reported by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Technology…The Enabler

It’s no surprise that most industries are being penetrated by the enabling influx of technology. The areas covered are:

  • The high Growth in Technology jobs
  • The importance of Soft Skills
  • Jobs with High Mobility (Freelancing anyone)?
  • Jobs that exist with a Low Supply of Talent
  • New and Emerging Skills

But before you rush to cry out in alarm, may I suggest that you look deeper. Though your career path may be included in the evolution (see Mnemonic pictorial graph), check ways in which you may Conjure up the courage to go full speed ahead and embrace the change. This not only pertains to individuals, but to employers who must keep in tandem with the change to see what’s happening in the global and local marketplace.

Remember, to stand still is to be left behind.

If you are an organzational leader pondering what’s holding back your organization from achieving success, or an individual that wants to ensure you are prepared, let’s connect.

Cheers!

The Holidays Arrgh Here! How To Handle Employee Time Off Requests…

I️ received a call with an enquiry about the holidays, and time off. No doubt a pain for employers and an avid desire for team…

I️ received a call from a business owner about time off during the holidays. “Everyone wants to take time off at the same time. What’s the best way to handle this during the holidays?” she Dubiously asked.

Time off during the holidays can be a Riff issue for employers, and an emotional desire for team members. Employers fear absence will impact business results. Meeting the demand often prove overwhelming for small business owners who operate in the hospitality, retail, and other industries that service holiday needs.

On the other hand, employees wish to spend time with family, especially those visiting from out-of-town. Let’s not forget the busy preparations  involved, amidst the hustle and bustle of the holidays.

So how can we balance the two? You don’t have to be mean about it. I concur with Kim Scott’s recommendation on the topic. Here’s my take on the issue.

  1. The Balancing Act. Try the trade-off. Employees know the drill. Share holiday coverage needs and let them work it out amongst themselves. Only step-in if you absolutely must.
  2. Comp days. Give them half/full day off at less demanding times. You will find this works very well, and shows compassion to those who must work.
  3. Flex-Basket. Try a flex-basket of Goodies from which they can choose. This would include a selection of delights such as lunch, dinner, drinks, partnership with vendors for relaxation/rejuvenation  goodies (e.g. mani/pedi, movie tickets, etc.). Believe me, this works wonders.

So there you have it! Three simple tips that will bring delight to your team, and smooth your business over the stressful holidays.

Noticed anything missing that you would add to best manage this issue during the holidays? Do share!

Cheers!

Attrition’s Rat Race: Fact or Fiction?

Attrition is Obsolete! Often so many still considered this as a mark of the good. Even me! Why?….

The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) shared an article by Daniel Sonsino titled Attrition is Obsolete.  In it he discussed the very necessary topic of attrition. Often so many still consider this as a mark of the good. Even me! Why? Because in my capacity as head of Human Resources for a major international pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline, boasted of less than 5 percent turnover for years! Wow! What an achievement!

Not so today. Workers in today’s workforce are the least bit Tame. They are restless and not Cloaked as Sinsono argued in the following points:

  • People are changing jobs more frequently. staying with a job from lifetime, then over 4 years, to now less than 3 years.
  • Millennials are restless. Over 60 percent are open to new job opportunities
  • Employment relationships are changing. 40 percent of the U.S. workforce is made up of continent workers including temps, self-employed, and part-timers
  • Talent is in charge. People have more career options and leverage.

Reducing Attrition: What to do?

Reducing attrition rates is like keeping ice solid in the hot sun…it’s futile. People leave for reasons including spouse’s new job, family care-giving responsibilities, or lower cost of living.

Sonsino suggested that employers focus on:

  • Accepting that you will not retain all your employees
  • Focus your efforts on the employees who are most important to retain (i.e. those with the knowledge, skills and abilities critical to your business).
  • Build an alumni network so you can keep track of those who leave. Attract them back when the time is right.
  • Revise HR policies that make it harder for former workers to return. Welcome back boomerang employees with potentially continued vacation, stock options etc.
  • Establish shared accountability. Partner with other executives and when employees leave, counter with an offer letter good for up to 2 years in the future.
  • Devise a workforce composition strategy. Devise programs to attract to full-time status those contingent workers critical to your business. In exchange, also do the reverse.  Move some full-time workers, to contingent worker status.

Does the above bring  an Exceptional level of curiosity and discomfort to your business? Indeed it is cause for concern. If you need help with shifting up your workforce, consider an external partner. It will be worth it.

Cheers!

Radical Steps To Deal With A Bad Boss

We show up everyday doing a job that we don’t like, and then feel like we are losing our mind when we are expected to be productive and profitable.

Get angry! Tell them off on national TV-like that famous weather reporter did! Give them a piece of your mind-like that flight attendant did, then de-planed! Or quietly sneak away never to return again, which unfortunately happens too often.

Though we may smile at these examples, they are real life situations that actually happened. As a HR consultant, I have worked with clients that have had these experiences and more. Because we spend most of our time at work, it would be great for us to really like what we do, and who we have to work with.

Vincent Van Gogh said that he put his heart and soul into his work and lost his mind in the process.  How many of us really feel that way?  We show up everyday doing a job that we don’t like, and then feel like we are losing our mind when we are expected to be productive and profitable. It’s hard. But we keep at it if we are to cover our basic needs to survive, thrive, or for those at the higher levels, fulfill our higher need to self-actualize. 

STRATEGIES FOR DEALING WITH A BAD BOSS

If you have a bad boss…see qualities in 23 signs you have a Bad Boss, it is not likely that you are going to change them. So here are a few strategies to help you take the steps to work better with him or her.

  • Have an early, upfront conversation about what is important to you in a leader and how you can best work together. In a civil manner, discuss things such as:
    • Leadership style and the coaching you would need to develop.
    • Expectations. What he/she expects from you, and what you expect.
    • Perception. How each of you perceive “success” with regard to the job.
    • What “meets expectations” or “exceeds expectations” look like on the performance-rating continuum.
    • Your current performance

 

  • Be proactive and check in with him or her often to provide reports, or updates.
  • Acknowledge them publicly for their support, especially when they have been instrumental in helping you succeed.
  • If problems occur that escalate, have a conversation with the HR manager to ensure that any complaints are logged. HR will take the necessary steps to help resolve the issue and can serve as a mediator in future meetings.
  • If 360-degree feedback systems, and other anonymous options are in place in your organization, do use them to provide input regarding your concerns.
  • Keep a record of dates, times, and specific examples of issues that have occurred so that you will be able to recall them when necessary.

Essentially, do your best to try to work with the situation you are charged with at the moment. Nothing lasts forever. Things do change sometimes. But by all means, if the horizon really looks bleak in that company, then start the process to move on, especially if  it starts to negatively affect your health. Start the job change process to search for a new opportunity. Take the steps to:

  • Update your Resume
  • Refresh your LinkedIn Profile
  • Connect with a Recruiter
  • Consider other career options

It’s important to heed the caution before you make such Radical change….Making irrational decisions then saying “oh wait”, will be too late.  So be cautioned that you never leave a job without first finding another one. It will be well worth it in the long run.

 

 

 

23 Signs You Have a Bad Boss

 

We have all had to deal with bad bosses at one time or the other throughout our career. We scream, complain, lose the Zing, become demotivated, do barely enough to get by, or inevitably jump ship. If you are dealing with a bad boss here are a few examples of characteristics  that depicts the behavior.

 

 

Common Bad Boss Behavior

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  1. Lack of vision and inability to communicate effectively
  2. Micromanaging
  3. Thinking you have all the answers and that you must have all the answers
  4. Working late everyday
  5. Poor Hiring Decisions
  6. Failure to Admit Mistakes
  7. Takes the credit but gives the blame
  8. Does not Lead by Example
  9. My way or the high way
  10. Mistakes being liked for being respected
  11. Provides little/no feedback or coaching
  12. Shows favoritism
  13. Task-focused vs team-oriented
  14. Embraces the status quo
  15. Being a good ‘doer’ means you will be a good manager
  16. Selects and leads based on “like me”
  17. Ignores diversity of thought or varying opinions
  18. Past focused vs present/future
  19. Lacks courage
  20. Being a friend instead of a leader
  21. Failing to delegate and demonstrate trust
  22. Allowing ego and pride to get in the way of good decisions
  23. Personal agendas/motives

If you are a new manager, reflect on these characteristics. Recognize the signs and plan to change. You will then be on your way to becoming a good leader.

10 Worse Jobs 2016

Hate your job? Hold up, it could be worse. Here’s SHRM’s list of the worst job this year.

1. Newspaper reporter
2. Logger (forestry)

3. Broadcaster

4. Disc jockey

5. Enlisted military member

6. Pest control worker

7. Retail salesperson 

8. Advertising salesperson

9. Taxi driver

10.Fire Fighter 

Common thread is the losing battle with professional growth opportunities, salary, demands on time and the stress associated with jobs such as firefighter. So Keep your eyes open and know when it’s time for a change.

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Employers are Paying More for These…

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We all go through different phases in our lives. Let’s face it, our careers are intertwined in our everyday lifestyle. We strive to be educated whether in a formal educational institution; through our life experiences; or a combination of both. Our dreams, goals, and aspirations range from starting and raising a family, getting our dream home, building our business, and the list goes on. All are intertwined in life’s journeys.

“The U.S. is basically at full employment” …. statement made by CNN Money in their article on employment. Whether or not we agree, jobs have been added….maybe not the ones we like, or at the salary that we want, but that was the finding.

So what are employers paying more for? Here are the top 21 skills gleaned from Money Magazine that revealed the findings of payscale.com money research. These high demand skills give us the best reach for getting a higher salary to advance us to the next phase of our lives. Skills listed in order of highest paid to lowest.

  1. SAS (Statistical Analysis System)
  2. Data Mining/Data Warehousing
  3. Search Engine Marketing
  4. Data Modeling
  5. Contract Negotiation
  6. Software Development
  7. Strategic Project Management
  8. Strategic Planning
  9. Technical Sales
  10. Customer Service Metrics
  11. Financial Analysis
  12. Risk Management / Risk control
  13. SAP Material Management
  14. Business Analysis
  15. IT Security and infrastructure
  16. Lean Manufacturing
  17. Forecasting
  18. Clinical Education
  19. Computer-Aided Design/Manufacturing
  20. Systems Troubleshooting
  21. New Business Development

Take a look at the list again to see where your interests lie. Examine your current skills, capitalize on them, or plan to build any gaps. Stay tuned for our next discussion on the Most Flexible Career Skills if you are looking to jump to a new job, or industry.

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